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other. >> well, if you look at the university level, the u.s. is still the predominant science and engineering engineer in the world. if you were quantitatively come look at all kinds of dissonance on the numbers because a very large engineering graduation rate in some curlers countries, particularly china. but there's a lot of dispute about what the numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, science and engineering in the u.s. and university level are so predominant in the world, though other countries are catching up as others have said because the u.s. was the only man left standing are the only person left standing at the end of world war ii and has a free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 is concerned, things are quite different. do you have huge disparity in quality, even with a few 50 miles or so, i think we were sitting today you can probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, k-12 and terrible quality. and that's a microcosm of the u.s. as a whole, which has huge inequalities in k-12 education system. so its average performance on all t
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
could talk about what is going on -- what is the current state of science education in the united states? may be some of your view of what we could be doing better -- may be some of your view of what we could be doing better. >> the u.s. is a prominent science and engineering producer in the world. you will get all kinds of dissonance in the numbers i feel quantitatively because of their large engineering graduation rates in some very large countries come up to believe china, but there's a lot of dispute about what those numbers actually mean. in terms of quality, the science and engineering fields in the u.s. at the university level are the highest, though others are catching up, as others have said, because u.s. was the only man left standing or only person left standing at the end of world war ii, and it had the free field for two or three decades. as far as k-12 concerned, things are quite different. you have a huge disparity in the quality, even within 50 miles or so. i think of where we're sitting today. you would probably find outstanding quality, science and math education, and t
to have a really sound science before you make those difficult decisions. you know, i am a scientist. i have been taking care patients for 30 years. and i know that you don't change an operation that you do because some people have said that this new operation is a lot better. all right. you need to have years of unbiased will result before you make a critical decision that affect people's lives. frankly, i have not been convinced us what the real facts are. and i certainly don't know that we should be spending trillions of dollars over science that is argued about. because i have been through this before. i have seen people tout the medical theory, saying how great it was and see people act on that end the disastrous results. and i don't want to do that in the field of global warming. >> moderator: thank you. mr. mcdowell, you have one minute. mcdowell: i just look at the scientific issues. this should be an issue based solely on the science of the issue. right now, our legs have dropped about 20 inches in the last 10 years. i looked across the bigger and it really frightens me. i don'
to his last which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> here is this a shot from 31st and lake shore drive that he took at 3:00 and a gorgeous polestar sunrise from rosewood beach highland park illinois but we thought we would go up to lake superior this time we have seen these images who is a meteorologist and she is one of our former intern's and look at these shots from dust and both of the waves on lake superior and the snow dustin tells us he is already tired of the snow but you have a long winter ahead of you because it's only starting beautiful shots though. the first signs that the light northeast wind and a 25 degree temperature drop you need a 15 degree drops so that clouds conform. in a month that is almost 11 degrees cooler than november last year we are averaging 42.5 degrees. today for instance we have a high of 48. but we have averaged about 5 degrees below normal. look at these temperatures down in texas and oklahoma while the child grows up to the northeast part of the reason for that and these are current temperatures look at
are at the tech museum of innovation in san jose. if you want to come down here and enjoy the great science festival and you want to do that, hey, we have some great weather outside today. it looks like things will stay dry. the temperatures running a little bit cool, 40s and 50s now, but by the afternoon, high pressure taking over. and the temperatures warming up. we're planning on 60s and 70s. much improved weather throughout the weekend. high pressure bringing some 80s by sunday and monday. then cooling off toward the middle of next week. >>> as superstorm sandy bears down on new jersey, delta airlines starts moving planes and people all over the country. >> it's orderly. we know exactly where they're going and it's clean. >> we'll go inside the operations control center this morning to show you how delta shut down service, then restarted it after the storm. >>> and two top intelligence officials from afghanistan came to washington for a training course. then they disappeared. so where did they go and are they a threat? former intelligence insider john miller has some answers only on "cb
of people that are far advanced when it comes to science and technology, and even the ability to socialize with each other- we are more socially mature than most people that i meet outside of america. but i think we are far behind our advancement in technoscience and technology when it comes to social maturity- perceiving what society should be, what a human being is. i think we have exaggerations, some of us, of what a human being is and what we should expect of a human being- exaggerations- and some of us poorly estimate the value of human beings. so we are not- to me, we are not the greatest society when it comes to social maturity. >> you know, that's one of the problems we've wrestled with in this class over and over again, because we hear such beautiful statements of love and caring and equality and justice coming from deeply religious people, and it's like you say, you know, somehow we haven't matured to a level that even respects the religions we profess. i'm just curious, in terms of your understanding of islam, how does that, in your own life, lend itself to making us better- bet
to the space station and it brought back nearly a ton of science experiments and equipment. the dragon is the only delivery ship capable of returning cargo now that the shuttle program has ended. >>> big time weather pattern change right here in the bayer and now we're taking about the -- bay area and now we're talking about rain back into the forecast. the rain when you can expect it as eyewitness news continues right here on cbs 5. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, >>> sunday, october 28th where high temperatures across the bay area today reached a good 14 degrees above normal. we banged anywhere if 66 in half-moon bay to 83 degrees in livermore and also to the south in gilroy outside is our live cbs 5 weather camera. see that right there? to you see it? the -- do you see it? the low clouds, the patchy fog, that's what's signaling a weather pattern change right here in the bay area. we hit 76 today in stance. now knocked back -- san francisco. now knocked back down to 76 degrees due to the marine layer that's now flipping underneath the golden gate bridge. currently 68 in san jose after realizing a
% water, right? that means the world has to be like 90% a&i. that's just science. think it's weird to collect air? you wouldn't think so if you saw what your lungs collect every time you breathe. people can make fun of me all they want, but i choose to see the glass half-full. ofir. protect your health with life-saving air quality updates from the american lung association. get our free "nsate of the air" app at lung.org. storm is now about 500 mi. across and high winds and waves are already counting the eastern seaboard. this is a live shot ... near maryland... 67 million people are in the expected path of the storm. here in chicago the national weather service has issued a lake shore flood warning for lake michigan from 1:00 a.m. tuesday to 4:00 p.m. wednesday. waves could top 16-22 ft. and winds could peak at 60 mi. an hour here in the midwest. stay tune with us for the latest developments >> that is the news for this sunday night >> instant replay is coming up next... break ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] for everything your face has to face. face it with puffs
. >> reporter: uc berkeley political science professor lin says voters even now are not paying a great deal of attention to the campaign on tv. sandy could change that. >> this is the kind of news event that will turn voters on. they'll be watching the news, they'll see the candidates but will see obama acting as president. >> reporter: the vice president tried to reenforce that imagine. >> i've never seen a guy so focused. >> reporter: governor romney turned a campaign rally in ohio into a storm relief drive. >> romney is in a tougher situation. he has to appear like he's not campaigning and yet he still needs to be in the news. >> would you eliminate fema if you before president? >> reporter: romney was peppered with questions of his plan to end fema. >> if mistakes are made, people will note them and it could hurt them. >> reporter: what would sandy's impact be on the election pundents on the days after the election. it could take historians months, days or years to truly sort out. >>> more than 100 tenants could be evicted from their floating homes. we'll tell you what the redwood city
code word for climate science for it stop funding climate science. romney himself says there is no scientific consensus so we should support more debate and investigation within the scientific community, except no action but to make problems worse. what about democrats? they conceded there is a problem and advocate that we work toward a problem -- program to set limits with other emerging powers. but that's it. no action. in fact, obama has emphasized, we have to work hard to gain when because 100 years of energy independence by exploiting domestic or canadian resources by fracking and other elaborate technologies. it does not ask what the world would look like in 100 years. so there are differences. the differences are, basically, about how enthusiastically the lemmings' should march toward the cliff. [laughter] the second major issue, nuclear war. it is also on the front pages daily. but in a way that was seem outlandish to some independent and fervoobserver. it does seem outrageous to many around the world. the current threat, not for the first time, is in the middle
from his first daof work this last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. frotd ameritrade. >> well, today's big storm on the east coast taking some attention away from the election and it's only eight days away. and both candidates are more focused on hurricane sandy. obviously, all of us across the country are concerned about the potential impact of hurricane sandy. this is a serious and big storm. charles: and also appears to be slowing town mitt romney's momentum. the latest gallup has romney up 4 points, 50-46 down one point from the previous poll and the latest rasmussen poll has romney romney by 3. we'll get the new number from scott rasmussen shortly and the washington poll, romney with a 1 point lead for the third consecutive day and a lot of people are talking about the controversial ad featuring, actress lena dunham. >> and of anybody, we want to do it with a great guy, it should be with a guy with beautiful, who understands women. >> and andrea, what congresswoman marsha blackburn. a young actress voting for the essential october is offensive to me f
is sort of the science of the campaign. the obama campaign has its ground game down to precise numbers, who they have to turn out where, they're spending so much time and money figuring this out. that's science. the romney campaign is passion, energy, they're coming on, their campaign seems a little more excited. part of that's the nature of being a challenger versus an incumbent running a re-election. depending on which city you're in, boston or chicago, you come out with two different -- both make really compelling cases for themselves. the polls are tight enough that either one could be totally not spinning and believing it, but who knows? >> who knows? >> tom brokaw, just final thoughts in the final days of the campaign, how much should the events matter? then you've got the science of the campaign muddled by the storm. >> well, if nothing happens that is unexpected between now and then, the scenario is going to be does the romney wave override the obama ground game and getting out the vote? the romney people have been counting on what happened with reagan, as you know, in 1980. di
cyclone. it was actually more like a winter storm when you look at the science behind it. and so that is covered. >> we're watching the president and chris christie make their way to the microphone. we'll cut away to that in a moment. >> okay. >> how soon will you be able to write these checks, tom? >> we're writing checks and putting people in hotels and things right now. we're helping people get their lives back together immediately. >> can you characterize how big this storm is in terms of the bottom line on allstate, versus other storms? >> i can't speak for just allstate but the industry estimates are of course it's speculative at this point but looks like it could be the fifth biggest hurricane in the history of the united states so it's a large, severe hurricane but in terms of allstate we're well covered. >> and you are putting people up in hotels and trying to answer their claims right away is what you just said. >> we're doing everything we can. we need help contacting loved ones if they need help with water, getting clothes, getting into hotels, we have people go door
down off the coast of baja, california yesterday afternoon. it brought back a ton of science experiment, medical samples and old space station gear. >>> do you think you have a bad rush hour? take a look. yesterday in madrid more than 2,000 sheep meandered through the city following a route used 800 years ago. it defended ancient grazing rights. >> children aren't always the most diplomatic. kate middleton promoted her book. one girl told the sister of duchess of cambridge what she thought about princesses. >> bet when you were 10 you loved it. >> i hate it. >> well then. excuse me. kate middleton's book called "celebrate" offers tips on entertaining through the year. i'm surprised she didn't have words for pipa. >>> coming up we'll have full coverage of hurricane sandy as it gets ready to make landfall along the mid-atlantic coast. i'm terrell brown reporting from new york this morning. this is the "cbs morning news". his morning. this is the "cbs morning news". [ female announcer ] today, jason is here to volunteer to help those in need. when a twinge of back pain surprises him. morni
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. liz: walmart down 3%. for the winner, bank of america. nice move to the upside. a lot is happening in this next hour. after the bell, we do have a bunch of news we need to get to you right now. david asman getting ready for that. david: we are looking at interesting moves. starbucks. talk about a gainer. liz: let's go to nicole petallides. better than expected jobs report. why weren't traitors impressed with the numbers? nicole: when you hear all the experts talk about the facts of rate of growth we are seeing, it will take nine or ten years to get back to normal levels for an appointment. that certainly does not make you feel like you should be fine this market on the contrary. short-term selling going on right now. david: look at what happened to apple. the last time i looked it was down $21. over 3% loss in just one day. 3.5% off now. nicole: it is very interesting. it looked as if it was going higher. i solved the lines for the ipad many. today, it is selling into the close. liz: energy one of the
ready, no matter what happens, which isn'rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. liz: how many of you bought airborne to take because you have a coal? the company that makes it is called shift nutritional international. look at these shares. stopping move to the upside of 45%. it looks like bear health care is going to be buying it. there you go. shift network up nearly 46% at the moment. this was a $22 stock earlier todaying and now, a 33.83 stock. a big move on that one. there's a lot of commerce happening despite all the storm and the angst going on, but it appears with just a few seconding left before the end of trade today that the markets are moving, functioning relatively well. david asman because we have the nasdaq coming up. david: all state reporting earnings as well, and the last minute announcement on netflix, n., boosted the share price 16%. liz: carl taking a 10% stake in netflix. nicole on the floor, back in action after a two day closure. obviously, nicole, it's the home retailers who shown today. >> unbelievable day, monumental day; right? pack -- bac
. what is a superstition? >> a belief or an action that is inconsistent with science. it needs to be aimed at bringing about good luck or avoiding bad luck. >> reporter: count yourself lucky if you're not superstitious. connecticut college psychologist stewart says most people are. in a world where we prize science, it may not be something to be proud of. >> i think only 40% of americans believe in evolution. >> reporter: what percent of americans believe in superstition. >> over half of americans have some kind of superstition that they believe in. >> reporter: so more americans have some specific superstition than believe in he have heution. >> that's right. that's not a good thing. >> reporter: a new cbs news poll for sunday morning finds more than half of all americans, knock on wood to avoid bad luck. 16% won't open up as indoors. 13% carry a good luck charm. and one in ten avoids black cats. at halloween we even have a holiday that celebrates our superstitions. nowhere are they celebrated more than here at the blood manor haunted house in new york city where you're surrou
bionic leg this week in a demonstration of strength and science. >> jack built a house? >> reporter: when zac vawter heads out for a walk with his family, his amputated leg is no big deal. >> i'm not sure they remember dad with a normal leg, so it's just the way it is. >> reporter: but what he wants to do now, with a different leg, is a very big deal. it could help in changing the lives of thousands of amputees who have lost a leg. it involves this experimental leg, that like the real thing, obeys signals from his brain. but his story starts with a 2009 motorcycle accident that cost him his leg from the knee down. vawter knew about experimental surgeries so he persuaded neurosurgeons to save nerves from the amputated leg and attach them above the knee. he reached out to dr. levi hargrove at the center for bionic medicine. he wanted a chance at this leg. >> we have electrodes or sensors, antennas o his muscles. he thinks about bending his knee or benning his ankle. we decode those signals and send a command to the center. >> reporter: the $8 million is funned by the military, anxious to fi
last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ashley: as we come back, yes, this is sandy as it moved inland causing trouble now on the great lakes. you're looking outside of cleveland, ohio, lake erie. you can see the lake water looking like the ocean pounding into those stone walls. waves up to 30 feet are being predicted. also on lake huron and lake michigan. a real mess out there. a lot of boats taken into harbor to ride out the storm. sandy a monster storm, we've seen what it did in the northeast. melissa: wow, look at that. ashley: these are winds on the backside of sandy creating very, very dramatic scenes from the great lakes region today. there you go, sandly certainly not done or over yet. melissa: look at the spray of water. really incredible. sandy's destruction is undeniable. there is good news out there. initial reports on energy struck struck in the storm's path -- infrastructure in the storm's path. matt smith, summit energy services and i joins us now. what is your assessment of how much supply has been taken off the market as a result
ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. monarch of marketing analysis. with the ability to improve roi through seo all by cob. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. i'm going b-i-g. [ male announcer ] good choice business pro. good choice. go national. go like a pro. ♪ >> new at 10, three numbers that could point to a romney victory on tuesday, this according to chris at fox news.com. despite the negative campaign against him. romney is tied with the president over favorability. over 50%. romney is leading in the early voting 50-42 and perhaps more important, holds a 7 point lead among independent voters. we'll talk about the numbers and the presidential race, all this hour, as well as the jobs report, and the new york, new jersey, gas crisis. and we're doing it with this company this friday morning, fox news contributor, and radio host, monica crowley is with us. charles payne is back,
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. so, which supeast 4g lte service would yochoose, based on this chart ? don't rush into it, i'm not looking for the fastest answer. obviously verizon. okay, i have a different chart. going that way, does that make a difference ? look at verizon. it's so much more than the other ones. so what if we just changed the format altogether ? isn't that the exact same thing ? it's pretty clear. still sticking with verizon. verizon. more 4g lte coverage than all other networks combined. >> at 25 minutes past the hour, i am updating you on super storm sandy, leaving people without power. the death toll is 18. travel is at a standstill as most major tunnels and bridges to and from the city remained closed. new york and new jersey officials said water damaged trains and buses could keep most of the system shut down for days. as a whole, more than 15,000 flights have been canceled due to the store. also here in new york, authorities are trying to figure out how to secure a construction crane that is dangling atop a high-rise. thous
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >> sean: as both candidates head into the final stretch of the campaign there is one critical state that could hold the keys not white house for governor romney and that is the state of ohio. historically no republican candidate has won the election without taking this battleground state. the latest poll shows governor romney in a dead heat with the president both at 48% and as obama is relying mainly on the quote auto bailout for a victor arery in the state, voters are more concerned about the overall economy. romney is leading obama when it comes to the handling of the economy. joining us is michael barone. what do you think? >> what is happening in ohio? well, this was one of the three firewall states. the obama campaign wanted to concentrate on three states where they got the lowest winning percentages in 2008 except for indiana and north carolina which they conceded, florida, ohio and virginia. since the october 3 debate, florida seems to be gone toward mitt romney. he has been winning almost all polls this. vir
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> andrea: there are a lot of things to consider when picking a partner. their background, religious views, maybe even their political views. with the election in full swing, dating a i cross party lines can create tension. so i hit the streets to find out can politics really ruin relationships? >> do you think politics can ruin relationships? any experience with politics ruining relationships? >> not yet. but that is probably talk about it on the first date. if you get it out of the way, disagree. >> i'm not going to talk about that on my first date. that's not what i'm there for. >> i remember one woman was absolutely beautiful, incredible, smart. but she mentioned the presidential contender i did not like. i walked out of the restaurant. >> i couldn't imagine being married to somebody who was going to vote for obama. or going out with them. my daughter doesn't have a boyfriend yet, right, nick? >> no. >> we don't have a clue which way we want to go yet. >> that way
in political science there's something called the median voting theory which has been dogma in that world for a long time. it's losing some of it. yeah, thank god. losing some lock on the academy. basically the idea is the natural tendency of a democracy is that the competition between the two parties will lead each party towards the, quote, median voter, the voter exactly in the middle. that's the voter that will give them the marginal vote that will have them win the election. they chase the median voter. the interesting thing is that if the median voter is someone whose political dictionary doesn't work, what does that produce in the political system? >> well, okay. this is a great conversation and i just taught this in my seminar last week at ucla. we could talk about this for a long time, but one of the things that, you know, what you need in order to get the median voter argument to work is a distribution of voters that is centered on the median obviously. >> right. right. right. >> so if we really think the country is moving away from the middle, that's going to change the behavior
of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> sean: joining me are two men trying to get to the bottom of the lies and coverup. so we just heard from charles woods the father of this american hero. here is a navy seal he s a mile away he is not at the consulate. he hears the cries for help. he is told to stand down twice. he puts his military career, his life in jeopardy and then gives his life because he is not -- and saves about what, 30 people. how is it possible that -- and he was killed 7 hours later. how is it possible congressman issa that everybody was requesting help before and during and no help came. how is that possible? >> as you know, our men and women in uniform believe that you respond and you don't believe people out there unprotected and certainly don't leave people behind. he was doing the right thing and i think his father deserves to be outraged that 7 hours passed and while overhead predator aircraft could see what was going on no aircraft, no is support was brought in to protect these men and women that could ha
with a real understanding of the science of the health impact, that marijuana is it a substance that is dangerous because it's illegal. it is not illegal on account of being dangerous. because it's not dangerous at all. [applause] it is well known that the impacts of marijuana are dangerous because of the illegal drug trade from marijuana drug prohibition. so the most important thing we can do to get rid of the health problems associated with marijuana is to legalize it. and on day one, on day one a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the d.e.a. to do a really radical thing. that would be to use science in determining what substances will and will not be scheduled. because marijuana is on a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the schedule. [applause] anded same goes for -- and the same goes for hemp, which is also a substance for which there are no bad drug effects. there are no bad health and safety effects. yet there are important health benefits. marijuana should be regulated but not in
of the energy sector and it has helped natural gas investment here with the marcellis shale. life sciences, education, health care. this is growing a lot due to the president's policies. he has had to combat the governor and many members of chairman gleason's party who have tried to stymie that growth. we want to see those policies take hold in continue to grow. one other issue he spoke about, the voter i.d. law, there is still confusion in the commonwealth. the severed by the republican party in pennsylvania and for governor corbett's administration to confuse people, which they do not, is something that i think was designed to suppress certain votes. i'm not suggesting that was his motive, but it is the motive of some republican. it is unconstitutional. people who want to vote, if they do not have an id, they can still go to the polls and have their constitutional records looked at. they will be asked for their photo id. the use of photo id has been accepted by both parties. it is something that is absolutely critical since terrorists attacked us. the right thing to do is to show photo i
to -- >> i know, but i'm talking about the social yol guests that write articles about science. let's check on the markets. futures are trading, but down about 61 points. half a percentage point for the dow industrials. could i make the point since we'll be looking for things to talk about today, i could make the point that statistics from labor day to the election 90% of the time if the markets up, the incumbent wins. the number of 13,090. so 17 points above where we close the day before labor day. ohio getting much closer apparently. anyway, let's look at the oil board. if you look at the s&p and how it's come down recently, a lot of the risk assets have come down at the same time the s&p has. went up on qe and once revenue started coming in it light or -- >> denniss also pointed out we could see big margin calls. >> take a quick look at currencies. or the ten year. probably down around 1.7% or so on the ten year. guess we'll go to kelly in london. you're back over there. you made it. that's good. >> i was on a flight out saturday night. i i know they started shutting town things on sunda
what the record and science say about the but secular course this storm is taking. -- of the particular course the storm is taking. >> what makes every storm unique is a combination of things, the time of year, strength of the structure in magnitude and size. sandy is unique in a number of ways. it is certainly not common for a system to come in at this strength. but if you look back in history, tropical cyclones have come up the east coast many times in the past. the whole east coast is vulnerable to storm surges and hurricanes. look at isabel in 2003 that came in a little bit further south and had all the storm surge. it has taken a different path, going it in a different direction than this one is. every storm is unique. this is not 100 percent unprecedented, but certainly not common to have a system of this magnitude coming from this direction at this time of year, and what makes this nearly unprecedented and very unusual is the transition to oppose best tropical cyclone and all the different hazards you have in one time. >> i think this is the only time i know of with the hurricane
this and put yourself in danger? >> ever since i was a kid i had an interest in science and nature and weather and an interest in photography and adventure. storm chasing has allowed me to travel to all 7 component -- continents documenting some of the worst weather in the world. >> describe the scene out there right now? >> right now it is dark here obviously we can't see what's going on. but earlier today the storm surge was outstanding. the ocean was as angry as i have ever seen it. the spot where we were on rockaway beach right on the boardwalk it no longer exists. when we were down there we knew it was going to be bad we could tell from the direction of the wind and what was to come. that was not a safe neighborhood to be in. we were able to get out just in time. the storm surge flooding was just coming in and of course now we are getting reports of the fires there, the complete devastation some of the neighborhoods along the water. >>> george, put the flood in perspective for us? how does this compare to other storms we have seen? >> the easiest one to compare it to would be eirene. i wa
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. you're watching "squawk on the street" live from the financial capital of the world. opening bell set to ring in a little less than two mississinu. the man on that balcony right there. normally it is celebratory. today is more about resolve. making this thing happen amid difficulties and problems. no guarantees about how today is going to go. they are as sure as anybody expected them to be even once we started getting that surge in the new york harbor. >> bloomberg terminal is not doing that well now. that story. bob steel worked at goldman. this ubs news is moving everything august of the big international banks. this is an underreported story. >> i want to do more. hopefully within our broadcast. we have so many things to cover. i agree with you. i want to get to ubs. it does have far reaching implications potentially for what they did. hopefully we'll have more on that. >> ubs and deutsche bank. higher trades in the banks overseas. financials here on the s&p 500 is the best perfor
the science of polling. >> or the number of times i have refused to pick up my phone when i can see it's research firm. but nonetheless, i think a nightmare frankly, maybe we can all agree on this, there are some electoral college/popular vote difference. >> one scenario is that it just doesn't come down to one state, like ohio, is that you got four, five states and each one of those five is in that circumstance and we're in total confusion. >> we have december 31st coming up. >> you talk about ohio, they don't even count all of the absentee votes in ohio until november 16th. it will take longer than that for the provisional votes. you talked about polls. last time around, our abc news/washington posthad president obama's dead-on. 53%. now romney at 49%. talk about the possibility that romney wins the popular vote and loses the electoral. >> in 52 presidential elections the popular vote and the electoral have con insided john quincy adams. hayes in '76. bush over gore in 2000. that's not a bad record. 52 out of 56. i wouldn't worry about it so much. >> or 2 out of 3. >> i think 2000 wa
is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's ju common sense, from td ameritrade. liz: breaking news right now we're looking at a storm that is hovering right over the coast and near new york city, david. david: it may not look that bad, you don't have a lot of trees cannot a
science monitor." he wrote a story about the pros and cons of underground power lines. that's why we dragged him out on the show tonight. why doesn't every city have underground power? >> right. so it makes a lot of sense. think about it, take the wires, you put them underground. then they're protected from nature's elements but in reality turns out to be very expensive. it can cost anywhere from five to 10 tiles more to install underground cables than it can overhead lines. melissa: but how much does it cost every time the power goes out? i mean we're looking at trees hanging from power lines right now. >> exactly. melissa: how much does it cost to fix it? how much does it cost to rebuild the house burned down because of a downed power line? >> right. you know, it is a tradeoff, kind of a cost benefit analysis people have to take into consideration. the thing is there is lot of up-front costs when you're burying lines underground and people are a little hesitant to agree to a surcharge on their electrical bill whereas people are more likely to dish out money for if a tree has fallen
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade.
, climate change is not even gotten talked about. having all this freakish weather and all the science is so overwhelming about climate, yet you don't see it on the nightly news. is there a story that you wanted to grab of stuff during your tenure at abc in say, we have to cover this war? >> there were several we have had discussions about. actually, one of them was the environment and how we cover the environment. every time we tried to do a prime-time special we would not get a rating, and that led -- one of the chapters are right about this, where i don't come across well, we had leonardo dicaprio at one point, president clinton, and i get killed for it. i did not intend, but we did a prime-time environmental special , and dicaprio was the chairman of earth day that year, and we talk to my that he would make an appearance at the end -- ended up interviewing the president. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment and a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more than other people did. john miller, our correspondent went
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> normally around this time we would talk about the opening bell doing stock chat. the markets are closed. i made a quick list this morning of broad sectors off the top of my head. travel, banks, exchanges, retailers, restaurants, insurers, and utilities. >> i tell you what will happen which is part and parcel with 2012. the quarters will be reported and everyone will use this as an excuse of why things are not so great. refining company lose as couple days. the supermarkets, we have numbers there. clearly when you went to the supermarket this weekend they were selling stock that would probably otherwise be there forever so you can restock. kroger up nicely last week in anticipation of a big rush this weekend. >> look at this note from citi. the note put out on friday detailing exposure that retailers have. most exposure to the east coast where the hurricane is going to hit. super value up 34% of stores in the northeast. you mention drugstore chain or supermarket is where people might go to stock up for preparation
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